Skip to content

Follow us:

Business, Engagement Edition Retaining Motorcycle Competitors

By:

By: Paul Caslick •  4 years ago •  

Grassroots motorcycle competitors have entered into a world of vastly different ideals to that of mainstream athletic-type sports. Some motorcycling families will adopt some of the mainstream sports in addition, as a means of cross-training for their child, sometimes more than one. These are the ambitious parents of a child, eager to see their golden youth become the next motorcycling megastar. They are shuffled into race gear after school, riding lap after lap perfecting a program that leads to certain burnout, in many cases long before the kid reaches teenage years.

As a coach, being “selected” as the one to guide and mentor a young child at first can be relatively stress-free. But as most parents want results and they want them now, this stress can at times become a nightmare.

Young children do not understand goal-setting or future plans. From a young age they need to be motivated and encouraged to have fun and learn. In my view, most children should not be subject to motorcycle competition until they are at least 10-12 years old. By then they will have had their skillset and coordination developed over a number of years and can determine for themselves whether many weekends on the road, away from family and friends is really what they want to experience.

Retaining competitors isn’t easy in motorcycle coaching, particularly competitors from a really early age. So many factors can alter outcomes and strain relationships. Cost is a huge factor in this sport, and on top of vehicles, machinery, trailers, motor homes, entries, licenses and travel, coaching also doesn’t come cheap. Some sessions can be 2 hours in duration, and up to 2 sessions per week if the family has the luxury to afford it. Many riders will also experience broken limbs very early in their career, so confidence is always a rollercoaster ride that has an adverse effect on one’s ability to enthusiastically want to take part in any sort of activity involving motorcycles, even though the parents insist on continuing with the program.

Two of the biggest retaining tools are having an individualised step-by- step development system in place and trust. Trust between the coach and rider, and trust between the family and the coach, so that the family trusts the coach with any advice given or suggested. With pre-teenage adolescents, this can be difficult at times as parents have pre-conceived outcomes, and enthusiasm blinds the ability to listen and understand the slow process required to retain longevity in this sport. In a sport that’s tough and hard, I have a 3 strike rule with parents. If they are given information 3 times and don’t take it, I move on. In particular, when the information is more vital for safety and longevity than trying to buy winning.

This brings me to coaching the more elite competitors. These athletes have been through all the above mentioned trials and tribulations. They have been broken and stumbled on obstacles along the journey, but have the maturity and ability to trust and be their own judge on who is providing them with what they need to succeed. They no longer have their decisions made for them, as they are in control of their own future. Coaching riders from grassroots to elite level can be extremely rewarding. In most cases, the coach has become one of the athlete’s most trusted sources of information and they have forged a lifelong friendship.

Paul Caslick bio

With over 30 years of motorcycle racing and riding experience, and multiple Australian and state championships along the way, Paul Caslick has developed and perfected his coaching approach. An accredited coach who conducts elite courses with the AIS, Paul has trained many who have gone on to become National and World Champions. He also runs his own specialty motorcycle competition training academy, Caslick Coaching.

Share this article

Featured Articles

Put Your Oxygen Mask on First

Too often we hear of the accountant whose books don’t balance, the...

Becoming an International Coach

By: Bill Sweetenham •  4 months ago •   Here is my detailed outline for a developing…

Coaching in the Time of COVID-19

By: Maria Newport •  4 months ago •   What they don’t Teach you in Coaching School…

One Question

Being a business coach is a dream job. The click you have with your coachee……...

This content is for Community Coach and Career Coach members only.
Login Join Now

COACHING BY NUMBERS

By: Sean Douglas •  2 years ago •   Is data analytics the future of sports coaching?…

Are Coaches Educators or Trainers

By: •  2 years ago •   Are Coaches Educators or Trainers As all coaches know this…

Put Your Oxygen Mask on First

Too often we hear of the accountant whose books don’t balance, the builder with an…

COVID VUCA!

HEALTHY THINKING IN A CRAZY WORLD In 1989 the Berlin Wall came tumbling down and…

Negotiation Skills: Art or Science

By: Margot Smith •  4 months ago •   We learn how to negotiate from a very…

Trust, Purpose, Anxiety, Identity

By: Steve Barlow •  4 months ago •   “It was my first day on the job….

A Wake Up Call for Business

By: Alan Ste •  4 months ago •   Recently Bill Gates said that the one question…

Coaching Through COVID and Beyond

It happened so fast. One minute it seemed that I was gearing up for a…

Creating a Sense of Safety in Your Remote Conversations

I belong to a community that gathers online once a week to help each other…

COACHING THROUGH AN ADHD LENS

By: Michele Toner •  2 years ago •   If you are working as a coach, there’s…

COACHING THE MUSICAL

By: Chérie Carter-Scott, Ph.D. MCC •  2 years ago •   Coaching is a way of being….

Cancer Coaching

By: •  2 years ago •   1 in 2 Australian men and 1 in 3 Australian…

Career Snakes & Ladders

By: Margot Smith •  10 months ago •   Careers can sometimes be like Snakes & Ladders….

Coaching Behind the Mask

By: •  1 year ago •   Coaching Behind The Mask 7 Steps to Success By Steve…

COACHING 5 GENERATIONS

By: Marie Zimenoff •  1 year ago •   How Career Coaching is Evolving to Serve 5…

Busyness Obsessions

By: Kasia Jamroz •  1 year ago •   How to win a race without the finish…

COACHING THROUGH AN ADHD LENS

By: Michele Toner •  2 years ago •   If you are working as a coach, there’s…